Grief and loss

Grief is the human response to loss. When considering grief most people think of the death of a loved-one. However, people can grieve many losses including that of their career, health, hopes or dreams, or the end of an important relationship.

Grief often involves feelings of meaninglessness, sadness, longing, anger, regret, guilt, and loneliness. There is no correct way to grieve, and the depth and breadth of emotions associated with grieving often surprise people. ┬áThe object or person of loss need not have been positive for grief to be strongly felt. For many people, it is important to make sense of the loss or create meaning as part of the healing process of grief. Some people grieve by being active and busy, while others prefer to share memories and stories; laughing and crying in turn. Grieving can be done on one’s own or by sharing with others who are also grieving.

Therapy can be a useful way of learning coping strategies, anticipating and managing loss-related stressors, and enhancing one’s understanding of their pain, particularly if the grief lasts for a long time or prevents someone from carrying on with life’s responsibilites or daily functioning.

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